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Streamline / Art Moderne

1926 - Long Beach Airport Main Terminal, Long Beach, California 1931 - The Eaton's Seventh Floor, Toronto, Canada 1933 - Burnham Beeches in Sherbrooke, Victoria, Australia. Harry Norris architect.
De La Warr Pavilion- 1935, Art Deco, the first major Modernist public building in Britain, Bexhill on Sea, East Sussex. De La Warr Pavilion- Shapes tend towards streamlined, industrially-influenced designs De La Warr Pavilion- A dramatic stairwell in the pavilion.
Pan-Pacific Auditorium, Los Angeles, California. Wurdeman and Becket, 1935. Destroyed by fire in 1989. 1936 - Minneapolis Armory, Minneapolis, Minnesota 1937 - Wan Chai Market, Wan Chai,Hong Kong
1939 - New York World's Fair. Jewish Palestine Pavilion. 1937 - River Oaks Shopping Center, Houston, Texas 1946 - Gerry Building, Los Angeles, California
1949 - Sault Memorial Gardens, Sault Sainte Marie, Ontario Metro Cinema, Kings Cross Sydney Bather's Building, now a maritime museum at San Francisco's Aquatic Park, 1937, evokes a streamlined double–ended ferryboat
1934 Chrysler Airflow sedan 1942 Nash Ambassador Slipstream sedan. Airstream trailer
 
Bakelite radio Toaster  
     

De La Warr Pavilion- The pavilion in sunlight: "suitable for a holiday resort in the south of England"


Pan-Pacific Auditorium, Los Angeles, California.


Streamline was influenced by the modern aerodynamic designs, including those emerging from advancing technologies in aviation, ballistics, and other fields requiring high velocity. The attractive shapes resulting from scientifically applied aerodynamic principles were enthusiastically adopted within Art Deco, applying streamlining techniques to other useful objects in everyday life, such as the automobile. Although the Chrysler Airflow design of 1933 was commercially unsuccessful, it provided the lead for more conservatively designed pseudo-streamlined vehicles. These "streamlined" forms began to be used in the design of mundane and static objects such as pencil sharpeners and refrigerators.

Art Deco celebrates the Machine Age through explicit use of man-made materials (particularly glass and stainless steel), symmetry, and repetition, modified by Asian influences such as the use of silks and Middle Eastern designs. It was strongly adopted in the United States during the Great Depression for its practicality and simplicity, while still portraying a reminder of better times and the "American Dream".
Streamline Moderne

Streamline Moderne, sometimes referred to by either name alone, was a late branch of the Art Deco design style. Its architectural style emphasized curving forms, long horizontal lines, and sometimes nautical elements (such as railings and porthole windows). It reached its height in 1937.

The style was the first to incorporate electric light into architectural structure. In the First Class dining room of the SS Normandie, fitted out 1933 – 35, twelve tall pillars of Lalique glass and 38 columns lit from within illuminated the room. The Strand Palace Hotel foyer (1930), preserved from demolition by the Victoria and Albert Museum in 1969, marked one of the first uses of internally-lit architectural glass, and coincidentally was the first Moderne interior preserved in a museum.

Although Streamline Moderne houses are less common than streamline commercial buildings, residences do exist. The Lydecker House in Los Angeles, built by Howard Lydecker, is an example of Streamline Moderne design in residential architecture.


Judge's tower at San Francisco's Aquatic Park

Notable examples
1926 - Long Beach Airport Main Terminal, Long Beach, California
1928 - Lockheed Vega, designed by John Northrop, a four-passenger single engine aircraft, made famous by the use of Amelia Earhart.
1930 - Strand Palace Hotel, London. Foyer designed by Oliver P. Bernard
1931 - The Eaton's Seventh Floor (including the Eaton Auditorium and the Round Room restaurant) in Toronto, Canada, designed by Jacques Carlu, located in the former Eaton's department store.
1931 - Napier, New Zealand, rebuilt in Art Deco and Streamline Moderne styles after a major earthquake.
1933 - Burnham Beeches in Sherbrooke, Victoria, Australia. Harry Norris architect.
1933- The Lawson "Zephyr" clock designed by Kem Weber for Lawson Time of Alhambra, CA.
1933 - Merle Norman Building, Santa Monica, California See also History of Santa Monica, California
1933 - Midland Hotel, Morecambe, England.
1933-1940 - The interior of Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, designed by Alfred Shaw
1934 - Chrysler Airflow, the first mass-market streamline automotive design
1935 - The De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea, England
1935 - Pan Pacific Auditorium, Los Angeles, California
1935 - Edificio Internacional de Capitalización, Mexico City, Mexico
1935 - The Hindenburg, zeppelin passenger accommodations
1935 - The interior of Lansdowne House on Berkeley Square in Mayfair, London is redesigned and redecorated in the Art Moderne style and opens as the Lansdowne Club.
1936 - Minneapolis Armory, Minneapolis, Minnesota
1937 - Belgium Pavilion, at the Exposition Internationale, Paris
1937 - TAV Studios (Brenemen's Restaurant), Hollywood, California
1937 - Minerva (or Metro) Theatre and the Minerva Building, Potts Point, New South Wales, Australia
1937 - Bather's Building at San Francisco's Aquatic Park
1937 - Barnum Hall (High School auditorium), Santa Monica, California
1937 - Wan Chai Market, Wan Chai,Hong Kong
1937 - River Oaks Shopping Center, Houston, Texas
1938 - Mark Keppel High School, Alhambra, California
1938 - Normandie building, Mar del Plata, Argentina
1939 - Marine Air Terminal, La Guardia Airport, New York (pictured)
1939 - New York World's Fair
1939 - Cardozo Hotel, Ocean Drive, South Beach, Miami Beach, Florida
1940 - Gabel Kuro jukebox designed by Brooks Stevens
1940 - Greyhound Bus Station, Ann Arbor, Michigan
1940 - Las Vegas Union Pacific Station, Las Vegas, Nevada
1941 - Avalon Hotel, Ocean Drive, South Beach, Miami Beach, Florida
1942 - Mercantile National Bank Building, Dallas
1944 - Huntridge Theater, Las Vegas, Nevada
1946 - Gerry Building, Los Angeles, California
1947 - Sears Building, Santa Monica, California
1948 - Greyhound Bus Station, Cleveland, Ohio
1949 - Sault Memorial Gardens, Sault Sainte Marie, Ontario

Influences

Industrial and consumer product design

The style was applied to appliances such as electric clocks, sewing machines, small radio receivers and vacuum cleaners. These also employed developments in materials science including aluminum and bakelite.

Motion Pictures
The buildings in Frank Capra's 1937 movie Lost Horizon, designed by Stephen Goosson
The design of the "Emerald City" in the 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz