Top Ten Essential Architecture top ten Paris shops  
     
  For a more complete list, see Paris Main List  
1 Magasin au Bon Marche  
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architect

A. Boileau and Gustave Eiffel

location

22, rue de Servres, 75007 Paris. Telephone: 45.49.21.22 

date

1876

style

Beaux-Arts

construction

iron, glass, and masonry

type

Shop department store 

Le Bon Marché ("the good market", or "the good deal" in French) is the name of one of the most famous department stores in Paris, France. It is sometimes regarded as the first department store in the world. Although this depends on what is meant by 'department store', it may have had the first specially-designed building for a store in Paris. The founder was Aristide Boucicaut.
 
     
2 La Samaritaine  
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architect

Frantz Jourdain (1847–1935) and Henri Sauvage  

location

on the banks of the River Seine, at the north end of the Pont Neuf. The nearest Metro station is Pont-Neuf

date

1905-10

style

blend of Art Nouveau and Art Deco 

construction

a structure of four stages out of metal frame, with a court lit by the large glass ones

type

Shop
La Samaritaine is a large department store in Paris, France. It is owned by LVMH, a luxury goods company.
The large building is located in the Ier arrondissement, on the banks of the River Seine, at the north end of the Pont Neuf. The nearest Metro station is Pont-Neuf.
The store opened in 1869. The style is a blend of Art Nouveau and Art Deco, designed by Frantz Jourdain (1847–1935) and Henri Sauvage.
The department store owes its name to a hydraulic pump installed near the Pont Neuf, which operated from 1609 to 1813. On the front of the pump was a gilded bas relief of the Good Samaritan.
On 10 June, 2005 it was announced that La Samaritaine was to be shut for several years because inspections found it a serious fire risk.

 
     
3 Tati  
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architect

Auscher

location

140, rue de Rennes (Métro Montparnasse)

date

1904

style

Art Nouveau

construction

masonry

type

Shop

 
     
4 Patisserie Stohrer  

architect

Unknown

location

51 Rue Montorgueil, 2nd.

date

1720s

style

Rococo 

construction

stone

type

Shop

Paris is filled with this sort of typical residential building that has a shop on the ground floor. The combination began in the Middle Ages and continues today, in part because every generation of architect breathes fresh life into the style. The apartment with shop combination has given Paris its wonderful small neighborhoods. This particular address is interesting because the pastry shop, similar to so many across the city, has a very specific Rococo history. In 1725, the unfortunate bride of Louis XV arrived in Paris. Marie Leczynska was spectacularly unsuited for the position; her lack of French was the least of her problems.
 
     
5 Galerie Vivienne (originally Galerie Marchoux)  

architect

Francois-Jacques Delannoy

location

6 Rue Vivienne, 2nd.

date

1823

style

NeoClassical

construction

masonry, steel and glass

type

Passages Couverts- Covered Shopping Arcades 

This is the best-preserved of the famed 19th-century shopping arcades in Paris. The Neo-classic bas-reliefs and luxurious star patterns in the Italian mosaic floor are particularly impressive to modern eyes. But watch your step: the different varieties of stone have worn unevenly over the past 160 years. The floor’s creator, G. Facchina, cleverly tiled his name and Paris address into several thresholds around the Galerie in a decorative act of self-promotion. I often wonder if it worked. Above his floor, the walls are decorated in a celebration of commerce, with carved cornucopia, anchors, wheat, and beehives; unlike many Paris arcades, which have fallen into shabbiness, here the paint is fresh and the glass roof is clean. Structurally, the arcades’ iron frames support panels of glass that allow light into the interior space, much like a greenhouse.
 
     
6 Les Halles  

architect

 

location

1er arrondissement

date

original 1850s, demolished 1971.

style

Victorian Industrial

construction

original- steel and glass markets. Now underground shopping centre.

type

central market Utility

Les Halles is an area of Paris, France, located in the 1er arrondissement. It is named for the large central wholesale marketplace, which was demolished in 1971, to be replaced with an underground modern shopping precinct, the Forum des Halles. It is notable in that the open air center area is below street level, like a pit and contains sculpture, fountains, and mosaics.

Beneath this lies the underground station Châtelet-Les-Halles, central hub of Paris's express urban rail system, the RER.
 
     
7 Passages Couverts- Covered Shopping Arcades   
Passage Jouffroy vers Passage Verdeau Sadly, these passages didn’t hold sway for very long; they were soon displaced by the much larger and more alluring department stores. But even today, the largest French department store has kept an arcade reference in its name: Galeries Lafayette.  
     
8 Galeries Lafayette  

architect

Georges Chedanne and then his pupil Ferdinand Chanut

location

at the corner of rue La Fayette and the Chaussée d'Antin, Paris

date

1912.

style

A glass and steel dome, and Art Nouveau staircases

construction

masonry and steel

type

Shop

In 1893 Théophile Bader and his cousin Alphonse Kahn opened a fashion store in a small haberdasher's shop at the corner of rue La Fayette and the Chaussée d'Antin, Paris. In 1896, the company purchased the entire building at n°1 rue La Fayette and in 1905 the buildings at n°38, 40 et 42, boulevard Haussmann and n°15 rue de la Chaussée d'Antin.

Théophile Bader commissioned Georges Chedanne and then his pupil Ferdinand Chanut to design the layout of the Haussmann location. A glass and steel dome, and Art Nouveau staircases were built in 1912.