Top Ten Essential Architecture top ten Paris Apartment Buildings  
     
  For a more complete list, see Paris Main List  
1 Castel Beranger  

architect

Hector Guimard

location

Number 14 Rue La Fontaine, Paris, France

date

c. 1890 

style

Art Nouveau 

construction

masonry

type

Apartment Building

Never entirely resolved as a total composition, the Castel Béranger is nonetheless an important transitional work in Guimard's career. The stem and branch-like character of both the interior furnishing and the exterior ironwork stand in a curious and brittle contrast to the articulate, architectonic but disjunctive elements that make up the cumbersome mass of the building's exterior. With 36 apartments, each different from the next, the Castel Béranger is a curious compound of rational planning and non-rational intent and expression. Guimard was to exploit its competition as an occasion for promoting le style Guimard. To this end he staged an exhibition of the building and its contents in the Salon du Figaro in 1899, while simultaneously publishing a book of the work under the title, L'Art dans l'habitation moderne. Le Castel Béranger. More acerbic than his flamboyant country houses of the turn of the century and located in the fashionable, fast-growing suburb of Auteuil, the Castel Béranger gave Guimard a prime opportunity with which to demonstrate the synthetic subtleties of his style, in which urban and rustic references could be judiciously mixed together.
 
     
2 Flats at Rue des Amiraux  
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architect

Henri Sauvage

location

Paris, France

date

1923 to 1925

style

Early Modern

construction

glazed brick masonry stepping terraces 

type

Apartment Building

 
     
3 Les Orgues  

architect

Martin S. Van Treek,

location

67-107 Avenue de Flandre, 19th.

date

1973-1980

style

Brutalist

construction

masonry, concrete frame

type

Apartment Building

The residential towers of the Orgues de Flandre, in Paris 19th arrondissement.The Orgues de Flandre, which can be translated as Organs of Flanders, are a group of residential buildings located in the 19th arrondissement of Paris, France.

Built from 1974 to 1980 by the architect Martin van Trek, the buildings are located at 67-107 avenue de Flandre and 14-24 rue Archereau. The buildings are a housing project of 6 ha, made of many buildings of 15 floors and four dominating towers.
 
     
4 Maisons Jaoul  
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architect

Le Corbusier

location

83 Longchamp, rue de, Neuilly-sur-Seine, Paris, France

date

1954 to 1956

style

Modern

construction

brick and concrete

type

Apartment Buildings Co-operating: G.Samper, A.Wogensky and J.Michel 

First, a totally different, plan was made in 1937. In 1951 a new plan was made consisting of two houses: One for André Jaoul and the other for his son Michel Jaoul. The second house was delayed for two years. In the meantime the father died and there were financial problems. At last in 1955 the two houses were finished. The two houses have one big cellar and garage together. 
 
     
5 Rue Franklin Apartments  
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architect

Auguste Perret

location

No. 25b, Rue Franklin, Paris, France. 

date

1902 to 1904

style

Early Modern

construction

reinforced concrete frame 

type

Apartment Building

This apartment building with which Perret established his reputation is to be regarded as one of the canonical works of 20th-century architecture, not only for its explicit and brilliant use of the reinforced concrete frame (the Hennebique system) but also for the way in which its internal organization was to anticipate Le Corbusier's later development of the free plan. Perret deliberately made the apartment partition walls nonstructural throughout and their partial removal would have yielded an open space, punctuated only by a series of free-standing columns. As it is, each floor is organized with the main and service stairs to the rear (each with its own elevator) the kitchen to one side and the principal rooms to the front. These last are divided up from left to right into rooms assigned to smoking, dining, living, sleeping and reception
 
     
6 Ozenfant House and Studio  

architect

Le Corbusier

location

53 av. Reille 75014 Paris 

date

1922

style

Early Modern

construction

stucco exterior- studio daylighting by large north window and glazed saw-tooth roof. 

type

house and artist's studio

The house and studio in Paris for Le Corbusier's friend the painter Ozenfant is an early example of 'minimal' architecture, a prototype of the Dom-ino house and a manifestation of some of the principles which Le Corbusier was to set out in his famous 'five points.' It possessed a geometrical clarity inside and out which has since been lost with the elimination of the north-light roof and its replacement by a flat one.
 
     
7 Lycée Italien Léonard-de-Vinci  

architect

Jules Lavirotte

location

12, rue Sédillot near the École-Militaire Metro station

date

1899

style

Art Nouveau 

construction

masonry

type

Education

This building, that now hosts an Italian college, lays in a district crowded by Lavirotte’s works. It is important to know that many Frenchmen consider Lavirotte superior to Guimard himself.Here we find that the modernist author was heavily influenced by the great baroque French castles, mostly in the roof-window and in the roof itself.But, don’t worry, Art Nouveau is still here, in the iron-worked balconies and in the honour window. If you find all this too heavy, too "baroque" in the decorations, this means you haven’t seen anything else by Lavirotte.This building is among the first works by this author.
 
     
8 Avenue Rapp, no. 29  
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architect

Jules Lavirotte ceramic by Alexandre Bigot

location

Avenue Rapp, no. 29 near the École-Militaire Metro station

date

1901

style

Art Nouveau 

construction

masonry glazed ceramic elements

type

House

Close to the Lycée Italian Léonard-de-Vinci, is another structure designed by Lavirotte, Avenue Rapp, no. 29. Designed for the ceramist Alexander Bigot who designed the façade's glazed ceramic elements, it was built in 1901 when it won a municipal competition for the finest façade. Lavirotte's gift for exuberant forms attained its zenith in this façade, whose bravura set piece is the doorway.
 
     
9 7, rue Trétaigne  
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architect

Henri Sauvage  

location

7, rue Trétaigne, Paris 18 

date

1903-04

style

Art Nouveau

construction

reinforced concrete with ceramic cladding

type

Apartment Building

It is a good try in the way to healthyness, including a rational visible structure in the direct heritage from Viollet le Duc (concrete and bricks) and Art Nouveau decoration (doors, chimneys..). 
 
     
10 185, rue Belliard  

architect

Deneux

location

185, rue Belliard, 18th quater

date

c. 1900

style

Art Nouveau

construction

reinforced concrete with ceramic cladding

type

Apartment Building

 
     
11 "immeuble à gradins"  
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architect

Henri Sauvage  

location

26, rue Vavin Paris 6, Métro Vavin

date

1912 

style

Art Nouveau

construction

reinforced concrete with ceramic cladding

type

Apartment Building

This building shows the innovative ways followed by Art nouveau to tackle with problems such as poor light (There is at that time an epidemic of tuberculosis) with it's terraces, personal gardens, healthyness with the ceramic cover. 
 
     
12 14, rue d'Abbeville   
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architect

Alexandre Bigot céramiste Architects Alexandre & Edouard Autant

location

14, rue d'Abbeville Paris 10e

date

1901

style

Art Nouveau

construction

 

type

Apartment Building Immeuble 
 
     
13 31, rue Campagne Première  
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architect

Alexandre Bigot céramiste Architecte André Arfidson - 1870- 1935

location

31, rue Campagne Première Paris 14e

date

1911 

style

Art Nouveau

construction

terracotta cladding, steel

type

Apartment Building
 
     
14 10 Rue Babylone, 6th.  

architect

E. Codry

location

10 Rue Babylone, 6th.

date

1877

style

Haussmannism

The Baron set out different categories for apartments, with varying regulations according to street size and neighborhood. His vision was so successful that long after his fall from power, apartments continued to be built according to his standard: 5 stories in locally-quarried “pierre de taille” with a crowning floor of maid’s rooms under a Mansard roof. This particular example is a sober interpretation at the high-class end of Haussmann’s buildings. Architect Codry chose to give this building sober individualistic details, inspired by Classicism.
 
     
15 Haussmannism  
The Haussmann Renovations, or Haussmannisation of Paris, was a work commissioned by Napoléon III and led by the Seine prefect, Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann between 1852 and 1870, though work continued well after the Second Empire's demise in 1870.

The project encompassed all aspects of urban planning, both in the centre of Paris and in the surrounding districts: streets and boulevards, regulations imposed on facades of buildings, public parks, sewers and water works, city facilities and public monuments.
 
     
16 Postal Worker Flats  

architect

Frédéric Borel

location

113 Rue Oberkampf, 11th.

date

1994

style

Postmodern “new architectural hedonism”, which is the gleeful opposite of minimalism.

construction

Color, contrasting textures, and angular juxtapositions create visual interest and reflect what Borel sees in Paris itself: a great mélange of faces and places.

type

Apartment Building

In 1989, the French ministry of Poste and Telecommunications started a program to provide affordable housing in Paris for young people training for careers in the Postal service. The ministry already owned several under-developed sites in several different locations in the city and the decision was made to purchase additional sites and build 1500 new apartments. A group of young architectural firms were selected to design this housing and had completed about 900 dwellings by the end of 1995. Built on scattered sites in many different parts of Paris, this is some of the more vital and interesting new housing built in the city in recent years and, since they are built on typically small infill sites, is in stark contrast to the large ZAC projects which have received so much attention in recent years.
 
     
17 Pavillon Suisse  

architect

Le Corbusier

location

7K Boulevard Jourdan, Cité Universitaire, 14th.

date

1932

style

Brutalist

construction

concrete, glass, etc.

type

Apartment Building

The most famous architect of the 20th-century, Le Corbusier completed not even 60 buildings in his lifetime. But he continues to inspire both worship and loathing around the globe. Swiss by birth, Corbu is the man who coined the term “a machine for living”—which is what he expected from a successful house. He believed that mathematics contained an ideal formula for living, and the Swiss Pavilion is a magnificent example of Corbu working at the height of his power.