Essential Architecture-  Paris

Île Saint-Louis

architect

various

location

Paris 4th - métro: Pont-Marie
Very charming and romantic island in the heart of Paris.

date

One of France's first examples of urban planning, it was mapped and built from end to end during the 17th-century reigns of Henri IV and Louis XIII.

type

Outdoor space/ Park
 
  The south end of the Île Saint-Louis, seen from the Pont de la Tournelle.
  Present day
 
 
  Olden days
 
 
  maps through the ages
 
  Lutèce 50BC
 
  12th century Paris
 
  18th century Paris
   
The Île Saint-Louis is one of two natural islands in the Seine river, in Paris, France (the other natural island is Île de la Cité, the Île des Cygnes is artificial). The island is named after King Louis IX of France (Saint Louis).

The island is connected to the rest of Paris by bridges to both banks of the river and by the Pont Saint Louis to the Île de la Cité. This island was formerly used for the grazing of market cattle and stocking wood. One of France's first examples of urban planning, it was mapped and built from end to end during the 17th-century reigns of Henri IV and Louis XIII. A peaceful oasis of calm in the busy Paris centre, this island has but narrow one-way streets, no métro stations and two bus stops. Most of the island is residential, but there are several restaurants, shops, cafés and ice cream parlours at street level, as well as one large church, Église St. Louis en L’Isle.

Bridges that connect to the Île
Pont Saint-Louis from the Île de la Cité;
Pont de la Tournelle from the Rive Gauche;
Pont Louis-Philippe from the Rive Droite;
Pont Marie from the Rive Droite;
Pont Sully from the Rive Droite and the Rive Gauche.

Bibliography
Downie, David (2005), written at Fort Bragg, Paris, Paris: Journey into the City of Light, Transatlantic Press, ISBN 0976925109: "Island in the Seine", pp. 10-17

links

L'Île Saint Louis current photographs and of the years 1900
http://www.isle-saint-louis.com
  Special thanks to http://paris1900.lartnouveau.com/plan_du_site.htm
www.essential-architecture.com