Essential Architecture-  Island Rügen

Bobbin Church

architect

 

location

Rügen, in the Baltic Sea off the coast of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, north-eastern Germany.

date

1400

style

Hanseatic Brick Gothic

construction

Brick

type

Church
 
   
opening hours:
no regular opening hours

Entrance fees:
free

the building:
Nothing remains of the preceding structure (mentioned in 1250, originally owned by the Bergen monastery). The present church is an imposing, fieldstone structure with shaped brick elements plastered so as to leave the underlying surface visible. Brick is used for the corners of the building, gables, buttresses, vaults, and all ornamentation. The nave, choir, and sacristy were built in about 1400. It has a rectangular nave with a flat wooden ceiling, and a retracted, rib-vaulted choir. The two square choir bays have been repeated in enlarged form in the nave. The interior is whitewashed and in 1955 was painted in simple form. Floors are of limestone tiles. The choir is a step higher than the nave. The windows were enlarged, probably in the Middle Ages. The “Likhus” on the south side of the choir was built in the 17th century, and was extended in the 17th century to provide access to the patron’s box. The west tower was built in about 1500 of brick with a sprinkling of fieldstone (the upper part still later). Steep pavilion roof with a weathervane from 1657.
Oldest furnishings and accessories: Gotland limestone font from about 1300 (presumably from the preceding church). Cuppa wall decorated with twelve blind ogee-arches. Worth noting: the iron-grilled aumbry inserted in the south wall of the sacristy (from about 1400), decorated with Gothic tempera painting and carving, beside the altar sacrament house with iron-studded wooden door under a canopy and quatrefoil. Other furnishings: pulpit from 1622 (late Renaissance), high altar with choir screen (1668) and patron's box, confessional from 1775 (workshop of Michael Müller, Stralsund), portraits, sepulchral slabs. The churchyard is worth a visit.

links

Special thanks to www.eurob.org
www.essential-architecture.com